Music: Robert Wyatt — ‘Sea Song’

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Music: Matching Mole — ‘O Caroline’

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Music: Jeffrey Iqbal with Shankar Tucker — ‘Allah Hu’

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Music: Shankar Tucker sings with Mumbai — ‘Hum Loag’

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Music: Maati Baani — ‘Rang Rangiya’

Maati Baani (Nirali Kartik and Kartik Shah): Real freedom is when the mind is free from feelings of hatred, greed and vengeance. On the eve of India’s and Pakistan’s Independence Day [August 15], we present to you Rang Rangiya, a heart felt song of Love and Friendship. How many innocent lives have been lost in the wars? How many children today are living in the shadow of fear?

Love is our true nature but when greed and hatred overpowers the mind, wars happen. Countries consists of people and when people are friends how can there be wars?

It’s the time when each individual rises up to say No to War because we have waited long enough….

Lyrics:

Galiyon pe dil ke jiskaa hai makaan,
Woh hain yaar ki,
Humne toh jaani ek hi zubaan,
Woh hain pyaar ki,
Dono hi dono ka hain aaina hain aainaa
Humne banai hain apni subaah
Woh hain pyaar ki,

Ishq se karde ishq farozaan
Ishq se kar de rangreza
Rang rang rang rangiyare
Main to rang rangiya rangiya

Preet Na Kije Panchhi Jaise, Jal Sukhe Ud Jaaye,
Preet toh Kije Machhli Jaise, Jale Sukhe Mar Jaaye. (St. Kabir)

Tu aur main ka farq batayein
Naina ye naina jhoothe hain
Sach to yeh jaane Jo dil yeh maane
Sab ek rang se phoote hain

Chhal bulleya chal otthe chaliye jetthe saare annhe,
Na koi saddi zaat pichaane Na koi saanu manne, (Baba Bulleh Shah)

English Translation:

In the street of my heart there is the house of my friend,
We know only of one Language, which is of Love,
We are each other’s reflection,
We have created our new dawn of Love!

Let Love be luminescent with Love
Color Me in the Color of Love, Oh Colorful One!
Rang Rang Rang Rangiya Re Mein To Rang Rangiya Rangiya.

Rajasthani vocals: Lyrics by Kabir
Let your Love not be like a Bird, that takes flight when the Water dries up,
Instead, Love Like A Fish, which Dies when the Water Dries Up.

Those eyes that see you and me as different are wrong;
The heart that acknowledges, that all beings come from the same source, knows the Truth.

Punjabi Lyrics by Baba Bullehsah
Oh Bulleya, Lets go where everyone is blind,
Where there is no discrimination of caste and position.

Color me in the color of Love, Oh the Colorful One!
Rang Rang Rang Rangiya Re Mein To Rang Rangiya Rangiya.

Composed by Maati Baani https://www.youtube.com/user/Maatibaani https://www.facebook.com/maatibaani

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Music: Pat Metheny & The Metropole Orkest — ‘Proof’

The Metropole Orkest (or Metropole Orchestra), a jazz and pop orchestra based in the Netherlands, is the largest full-time ensemble of its kind in the world.

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Music: Pat Metheny & The Metropole Orkest — ‘Are You Going With Me?’

The Metropole Orkest (or Metropole Orchestra), a jazz and pop orchestra based in the Netherlands, is the largest full-time ensemble of its kind in the world.

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Music: Pat Metheny & The Metropole Orkest — ‘Into the Dream/So May it Secretly Begin’

The Metropole Orkest (or Metropole Orchestra), a jazz and pop orchestra based in the Netherlands, is the largest full-time ensemble of its kind in the world. Pat Metheny plays the 42-string Pikasso Guitar.

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Music: Pat Metheny & The Metropole Orkest — ‘Third Wind’

The Metropole Orkest (or Metropole Orchestra), a jazz and pop orchestra based in the Netherlands, is the largest full-time ensemble of its kind in the world.

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Music: Pat Metheny & The Metropole Orkest — ‘Minuano’

The Metropole Orkest (or Metropole Orchestra), a jazz and pop orchestra based in the Netherlands, is the largest full-time ensemble of its kind in the world.

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Music: Pat Metheny & The Metropole Orkest — ‘First Circle’

The Metropole Orkest (or Metropole Orchestra), a jazz and pop orchestra based in the Netherlands, is the largest full-time ensemble of its kind in the world.

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Music: Pat Metheny — ‘Always And Forever’

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Music: Imogen Heap — ‘Cycle Song’

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Music: Charlie Haden & Pat Metheny — ‘Our Spanish Love Song’

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Music: Charlie Haden & Pat Metheny — ‘Message to a Friend’

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Music: Charlie Haden & Pat Metheny — ‘First Song (for Ruth)’

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Music: Charlie Haden — 1937-2014

Charlie Haden & Pat Metheny — The Moon Song. Charlie Haden died on Friday.

In an interview with Amy Goodman on Democracy Now, Charlie Haden recounted a European tour he did in 1971:

I saw on the itinerary before we left that we were playing in Portugal, and I didn’t agree with the government there. It was a kind of a fascist government. They had colonies in Guinea-Bissau, in Angola and Mozambique, and they were systematically wiping out the Black race, you know? And so I called Ornette [Coleman], and I said, “You know, I don’t want to play in Portugal.” And he said, “Charlie, we’ve already signed the contract. We’ve gotta play. It’s the last country on the concert tour. Figure out — maybe you can do something to protest it, you know?”

AMY GOODMAN: The Caetano regime.

CHARLIE HADEN: Yeah. And so, during the tour we were playing one of my songs, “Song for Che,” and I decided that when we played my song, because it was connected to me, because I was the guy that was going to do it, you know, I would dedicate that song to the Black peoples’ liberation movements in Mozambique and Angola and Guinea-Bissau. And I asked — I think we were in Bulgaria, and we were doing a jazz festival there. Or Romania, we were in Bucharest, and I asked one of the journalists there, who was from Portugal, I said, “I’m planning on” — because he knew about the Liberation Music Orchestra. He says, “What are you going to do?” And I said, “I’m going to dedicate — what would happen if I did this?”

He said, “Well, three or four different things. You can either be shot on the spot, or they could pull you off the stage, or they could arrest you on the stage. They could arrest you in your dressing room. Or they can arrest you later. But you’re going to be arrested.” And I thought, you know, I don’t think they’ll arrest me, man. I’m an American jazz musician. This is a jazz festival. It has nothing to do with politics. I think I’m safe.

So I made the dedication, and I wasn’t arrested immediately, but, you know, when I did the dedication there were young people there, students, that were in the cheaper seats in front, and they all started cheering so loud that you couldn’t hear the music. And a lot of police were running around with automatic weapons, and they, right after we finished our set, they stopped down the festival, and they closed down in Cascais this big stadium that we were playing in. And we went back to the hotel, and so I was starting to get concerned about what was going to happen.

The next day, we went to the airport, and at the airport, I was trying to get my bass on the plane to make sure I could get the bass on the plane. And there were hundreds and hundreds of people in front of the airlines’ counters. And finally, one of the people from TWA came around the counter and said, “There was a man over there who wanted to interview you, and you have to stay here.” And I said, “I don’t want to be interviewed.” And Ornette came over and said, “What’s going on?” And they say, “They want to interview Mr. Haden, and you guys are going to get on the plane. And he’s staying here.” And Ornette said, “No, we’re not going on the plane. We’re going to stay here with him.” And they said, “No, you’re not. You’re getting on the plane.” They took them by the arms, and they led them on the aircraft. And I stayed there, and they took me down a winding staircase to an interrogation room and started pumping me with questions. They said, “We’re going to transfer you over to the PIDE headquarters.”

AMY GOODMAN: The police?

CHARLIE HADEN: It was the political police of Portugal. And so I said, you know, “I’m a United States citizen with a United States passport. I demand to be able to call the embassy.” And the guy who worked for TWA looked at me and smiled and said, “It’s Sunday, Mr. Haden. You can’t call the embassy. You shouldn’t mix politics with music.” [Continue reading...]

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Music: Bugge Wesseltoft & Sidsel Endresen — ‘Try’

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